Categories
Mac Heads

Sonar App for iPhone: Uncover Your Connections Everytime You Check-in

Nowadays, everyone is diving into the location-based app business…and rightfully so. The ba-jillions of us who use apps to “check-in” to various spots we frequent everyday makes the niche big enough for anybody who can add to the value of checking in make a name for themselves. Such an app is called Sonar, and its hook is it uses your check-in at a particular location to uncover your connection to other people who are currently checked in at the same location.

Image courtesy of Agent-X Comics
Sometimes it's okay to let people know where you are

Nowadays, everyone is diving into the location-based app business…and rightfully so. The ba-jillions of us who use apps to “check-in” to various spots we frequent everyday makes the niche big enough for anybody who can add to the value of checking in make a name for themselves.

Such an app is called Sonar, and its hook is it uses your check-in at a particular location to uncover your connection to other people who are currently checked in at the same location. If permitted (scary mofos privacy advocates need not apply) Sonar digs into your Twitter, Facebook, and Foursquare networks to discover publicly available profile information about similar friends, followers, and other relevant connections you share with people nearby.

Anybody who checks-in via Foursquare (or sends their check-in from any other service/app to Foursquare), Sonar will display the person, how they are connected to you, and any additional information publicly shared by the user. This means users do not even need to use Sonar in order it to find your connection with others, since it pulls from Foursquare’s API. Since Foursquare is currently on the top of the location-based app game, it’s safe to say you should get a nice list of connections, every time you use Sonar.

Once you open Sonar, you will get a list of nearby locations, and a number value of potential “connections” that have checked in nearby. You can also use the search field to find a specific location. Tapping on a location will give more info about the connections (name, profile pic, and how you’re connected). Depending on how you are connected, you can send them a tweet or follow their profile, leave a comment on their wall, etc. Again, if the user has decided to lock their profile (Booo!), you will only see public information.

If anything, Sonar can serve as a nice ice-breaker for networking/training event, conferences, and pretty much anywhere you want to “work the room”. Sonar creates that common link, so you can take it from there.

Your sonar profile enables you to selectively project facets of your identity- social and business connections, networks and affiliations, hobbies and interests- to people nearby the same way you express yourself via the clothes you wear, the way you walk, and the eye contact you do, or do not make. Unlike services that let you tell people elsewhere that you are here, Sonar is laser focused on helping you tell the people here that you are here, and THIS is what you are about.

The Sonar app is currently in public beta and free to download for iOS devices. So check it out, and drop a line in the comments section on how you can envision using Sonar to get your “networking on”.

[App Store Link]

Side Note: Do people still get their [blank] on? Let me know in the comments section if that phrase is getting old or not.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.